So with vSphere 6.5 now GA, I decided to upgrade my lab to vSphere 6.5. In my environment, I use a vCenter with an external Platform Services Controller (PSC). So as part of the upgrade, I have to upgrade the PSC first.

When you run the UI installer provided within the VCSA 6.5 Appliance ISO, you have the option to “Upgrade” a vCenter Server Appliance or a Platform Services Controller. The installer detects the component that you are trying to upgrade and prompts for settings appropriate to that upgrade.

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Published in vSphere: vCenter

So during the keynote at VMworld in Barcelona on Tuesday morning, 18 October 2016, VMware showed a demo of how a VMware Cloud infrastructure is stood up in AWS and following that, showed how a virtual machine was migrated with vMotion into the AWS hosted VMware Cloud. This seemed impressive. However, something’s been bothering me and I’ve been to the VMware booth to get an answer but came up short.

The question I have is around processor architecture. If I’m running Intel in my local vSphere environment and AWS/VMware decided to run AMD in the VMware Cloud on AWS, how would you get that vMotion migration to work? It can’t right?

Is there an option to select the processor vendor for the newly deployed VMware Cloud on AWS?

 

Answers on o postcard or comment section below! Go!

 

And we have an answer!! Thank you Alex Jauch (@ajauch)!

 

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Published in VMware vSphere

I've decided to create this dedicated page where I'll place "one line scripts". I sometimes use these one line commands to run reports on vSphere or SCVMM inventories, if I'm not permitted or able to run full length scripts in an environment.

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Published in Guides

Since moving to Lincolnshire in August 2014 and whist still working on customer sites in London the majority of the time, I found myself doing a lot of train journeys to and from London. I also started to realise that due to the workload I’ve been facing this year, sometimes juggling up to 5 customer engagements at once, that I very rarely have a few minutes during the day to actually read up on product documentation or anything else that is not directly related to the task at hand.

As we all know, things are moving very rapidly in our industry, more so now than ever before and the hypervisor and features that were once regarded as “awesome” back in the VMware ESX 3 or even 4 days now pale into insignificance when compared to the cast number of features and capabilities that lies simply within the ESXi 5.5 hypervisor. Then, when considering the entire vCloud suite of products and how they interact with each other and the hypervisor, it doesn’t take much to work out that things are becoming more and more complex with every release.

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There seems to be some confusion as to whether or not the Identity Appliance that ships as part of vRealize Automation (previously known as vCloud Automation Center, which will be referred to as vCAC 6 for the rest of this article) is required when deploying vCAC 6.1 in conjunction with vSphere 5.5 and later.

 As of vSphere 5.1, Single Sign-On (SSO) is a pre-requisite to installing the components for and including vCenter Server. It’s no secret that VMware’s initial implementation of SSO in vSphere 5.1 was terrible. It was over complicated in terms of its implementation requirements, even requiring its own database, to be manually set up using SQL scripts. Thankfully, VMware addressed many if not all of the SSO issues in its release vSphere 5.5, with SSO now being a much more simple and robust component in your vSphere 5.5 environment.

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Published in vRealize Suite

I’ve been thinking about retiring my old home lab server hardware for some time now. I’ve had two little HP ProLiant ML110 G5 servers for 5+ years. They’ve been good little machines and didn’t cost too much to run, but I can now tell that time has taken its toll on them. They each have a dual core Intel Xeon processor and maxed out at 8GB of RAM. With the management components of products such as vSphere, vCAC, vCD, etc. nowadays requiring at least 8GB per appliance, these machines have basically been made obsolete by the requirements of most enterprise applications today.

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Published in General

I am happy to announce that our new book, VMware vSphere Performance (ISBN: 9781118008195) is now available on Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk in eBook format on Kindle as well as Paperback. The Paperback version should be in stock at Amazon.com by 12 May 2014.

This title was first announced in 2011 and due to a number of issues and difficulties, the book was delayed several times. However, due to the hard work and dedication of my co-authors, Matt Liebowitz, Christopher Kusek and the editorial team at John Wiley & Sons, Inc. we were able to finally bring the title to print.

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Following the changes made by VMware to the vSphere 5 vRAM allocation sizes, I've released version 0.6 of my vSphere License Calculator to reflect the new vRAM allocations.

 

Please download version 0.6 and let me know if you discover any further problems with the calculator.

*The vRAM Entitlement for vSphere Enterprise has now been corrected to 64GB*

The new version of tha calculator can be found here

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Following some feedback from the community, I'm happy to release version 0.5 of my vSphere License Calculator.

 

The main issue that has been fixed in this release is a flaw in the formula that calculates the vSphere 4 License count based on the CPU core count.

 

The problem was discovered when a user tried to calculate licenses based on 7 core CPUs. This had highlighted a major flaw in the original formula for calculating vSphere licenses. The formula for calculating vSphere 4 Licenses has therefore been rewritten from scratch.

 

Please download version 0.5 and let me know if you discover any further problems with the calculator.

 

The new version of tha calculator can be found here

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This tool can be used to calculate the license requirements for vSphere 5.

 

WARNING: By downloading this tool, you agree to the following statement(s):

This calculator is provided free of charge with no warranty provided. The use of this calculator is at your own risk. The author or distributor of this tool cannot be held liable for any loss or damages as a result of using this tool. This calculator has not been approved or funded in any way shape or form by any software vendor, reseller or partner, including VMware, Inc.

The rules and figures used in this calculator are subject to change without prior notice.

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Published in Tools