Displaying items by tag: SSL

So, you've done all the hard work to change your Hyperic Server certificate (or not). Now you browse to your Hyperic server's management page via HTTPS on port 7443 and you're presented with this uninspiring message from your browser:

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Published in vRealize Suite

I've been working intensively with the VMware vRealize product suite over that past 4 months, including Hyperic. One of the things we have to do on our current project is to replace the Hyperic server certificate whenever a new Hyperic instance is introduced into the environment. This is a relatively straight forward task, but one that consists of quite a few steps. In this blog post, I've documented exactly how to go about replacing Hyperic server certificates.

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Published in vRealize Suite

Following on from my previous blog post where I mentioned that we’ve discovered a bug in the Hyperic 5.8.4 client (on both Windows and Linux), I think it’s only fair that I share our findings. It’s a bug that we discovered whilst deploying a very large vRealize Suite (two maximum sized global clusters of vROPS, vRLI, Hyperic and vRA/vRO).

Whilst carrying out some testing in my lab surrounding the impact of replacing SSL certificates in Hyperic, I noticed that if for whatever reason authentication between the Hyperic agent and Hyperic server fails, the Hyperic agent increases CPU utilisation of the client machine it’s running on to between 85% and 100%. At first I thought that it’s an anomaly, but I was then able to reproduce the symptoms a further 3 times in proving to VMware GSS that the issue really does exist. A long story short

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Published in General

vSphere 6 makes managing SSL certificates a lot easier than previous releases. It ships with its own Certificate Authority, (VMCA) that issues certificates for all components on your behalf, rather than having to replace each service certificate manually, or relying on self-signed certificates. This new VMCA comes with the Platform Services Controller (PSC) that can be installed as a separate appliance, or embedded within the vCenter Server installation or Appliance.

By default, the VMCA will self-sign its own certificate to be used as a CA certificate that will sign all requests for certificates. This self-signed CA certificate can be replaced by a certificate that is signed by a 3rd party root CA or your own root CA. Any certificate signed by the VMCA, which is an intermediate CA to your root CA, can then be validated by clients with the root CA and VMCA certificates installed.

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Published in VMware vSphere

ImageI recently had to renew my self-signed SSL certificate used to publish my Outlook Web Access with Microsoft ISA Server 2004. As it’s been a while since I’ve done OWA publishing, I found myself scrambling for information on the internet until I eventually managed to compile this document. As I would like to use this again in the future, I though I'd post it here for reference.

I always used to use the Microsoft Windows Certification Authority to sign my own SSL certificates, but as I don’t really like the way the Windows Certification Authority does things, and I do like the way OpenSSL does things, so I opted to use OpenSSL on good old trustworthy openSUSE Linux to:

  • Create a new Certification Authority that I can use for all my private sites
  • Create a new x509 SSL Certificate to replace the current soon-to-expire SSL certificate in use by my OWA setup.
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Published in Linux

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