Following on from my original vRetreat blog post, I thought it would make sense to report on some of the technical IT discussions that happened on the day, For this blog post, I am going to be focusing on the presentation by Darren Swift from Zerto.

So who and what is Zerto? Well, as started on the "About Zerto" page on their website,  "Zerto provides enterprise-class disaster recovery and business continuity software specifically for virtualised datacenters and cloud environments."

In simple terms, Zerto provides hypervisor-level replication and automation with no hypervisor vendor-specific lock-in. It provides continuous replication (no snapshots) of virtual machines between hypervisors and replaces traditional array-based replication solutions that were not built to deal with virtualised environments.

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I've seen cases where a newly extended VMFS datastore fluctuates between the old size and the new size. Virtual Machines running on th newly extended datastore prevents the correct size of the datastore from displaying.

I found the solution to the problem in KB Article 1002558

Products: VMware ESX and ESXi

The solution is:

  1. Shut down or VMotion virtual machines running on the extended datastore to the ESX host that created the extent.
  2. On all other ESX hosts other than the one that created the datastore, run vmkfstools -V to re-read the volume information.
  3. Power on or VMotion the Virtual Machines back to the original ESX hosts.

 

This is not only on VI3 hosts but on:

VMware ESX 2.0.x
VMware ESX 2.1.x
VMware ESX 2.5.x
VMware ESX 3.0.x
VMware ESX 3.5.x
VMware ESXi 3.5.x Embedded
VMware ESXi 3.5.x Installable

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Published in vSphere: Storage

@evankirstel I know what they are for. It just feels wrong to throw a good cable out, even if it seems obsolete
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