Following on from my original vRetreat blog post, I thought it would make sense to report on some of the technical IT discussions that happened on the day, For this blog post, I am going to be focusing on the presentation by Darren Swift from Zerto.

So who and what is Zerto? Well, as started on the "About Zerto" page on their website,  "Zerto provides enterprise-class disaster recovery and business continuity software specifically for virtualised datacenters and cloud environments."

In simple terms, Zerto provides hypervisor-level replication and automation with no hypervisor vendor-specific lock-in. It provides continuous replication (no snapshots) of virtual machines between hypervisors and replaces traditional array-based replication solutions that were not built to deal with virtualised environments.

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vSphere 6 makes managing SSL certificates a lot easier than previous releases. It ships with its own Certificate Authority, (VMCA) that issues certificates for all components on your behalf, rather than having to replace each service certificate manually, or relying on self-signed certificates. This new VMCA comes with the Platform Services Controller (PSC) that can be installed as a separate appliance, or embedded within the vCenter Server installation or Appliance.

By default, the VMCA will self-sign its own certificate to be used as a CA certificate that will sign all requests for certificates. This self-signed CA certificate can be replaced by a certificate that is signed by a 3rd party root CA or your own root CA. Any certificate signed by the VMCA, which is an intermediate CA to your root CA, can then be validated by clients with the root CA and VMCA certificates installed.

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Published in VMware vSphere

I’ve been thinking about retiring my old home lab server hardware for some time now. I’ve had two little HP ProLiant ML110 G5 servers for 5+ years. They’ve been good little machines and didn’t cost too much to run, but I can now tell that time has taken its toll on them. They each have a dual core Intel Xeon processor and maxed out at 8GB of RAM. With the management components of products such as vSphere, vCAC, vCD, etc. nowadays requiring at least 8GB per appliance, these machines have basically been made obsolete by the requirements of most enterprise applications today.

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Published in General