vSphere 6 makes managing SSL certificates a lot easier than previous releases. It ships with its own Certificate Authority, (VMCA) that issues certificates for all components on your behalf, rather than having to replace each service certificate manually, or relying on self-signed certificates. This new VMCA comes with the Platform Services Controller (PSC) that can be installed as a separate appliance, or embedded within the vCenter Server installation or Appliance.

By default, the VMCA will self-sign its own certificate to be used as a CA certificate that will sign all requests for certificates. This self-signed CA certificate can be replaced by a certificate that is signed by a 3rd party root CA or your own root CA. Any certificate signed by the VMCA, which is an intermediate CA to your root CA, can then be validated by clients with the root CA and VMCA certificates installed.

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Published in VMware vSphere

ImageI recently had to renew my self-signed SSL certificate used to publish my Outlook Web Access with Microsoft ISA Server 2004. As it’s been a while since I’ve done OWA publishing, I found myself scrambling for information on the internet until I eventually managed to compile this document. As I would like to use this again in the future, I though I'd post it here for reference.

I always used to use the Microsoft Windows Certification Authority to sign my own SSL certificates, but as I don’t really like the way the Windows Certification Authority does things, and I do like the way OpenSSL does things, so I opted to use OpenSSL on good old trustworthy openSUSE Linux to:

  • Create a new Certification Authority that I can use for all my private sites
  • Create a new x509 SSL Certificate to replace the current soon-to-expire SSL certificate in use by my OWA setup.
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Published in Linux